Non-native, invasive plants

Non-native, invasive plants often have an unfair advantage over our natives.  They may be able to out-compete our native plants especially with climate change impacting the adaptability of indigenous organisms.  These invasives typically have escaped someone’s landscape and can spread rapidly.  Some are quite lovely which is why nurseries sell them in the first place.  You should definitely NOT plant these; in fact, lobby with your local nursery to not sell them.  Also, volunteer for trail/habitat cleanups which often included invasive removal.

Here are a few of the more common ones:

Pampas grass is pretty but once established, it's very hard to remove.

Pampas grass is pretty but once established, it’s very hard to remove.

 

 

Castor oil plant is the source of castor oil, commonly referred to as the castor bean plant.

Castor oil plant is the source of castor oil, commonly referred to as the castor bean plant.

 

 

 

 

Wild fennel smells great and the seeds can be used in baking; you'll see it frequently in the Calavera Preserve.

Wild fennel smells great and the seeds can be used in baking; you’ll see it frequently in the Calavera Preserve.

Tamarisk (salt cedar) is lovely but spreads easily.

Tamarisk (salt cedar) is lovely but spreads easily.